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If you happen to be with your “average” American male, chances are he probably likes steak. A lot. I find that it is nice, every so often, to make your man a steak. I mostly think this because 99.9% of the time we eat steak, Jordan is the one grilling it.

The $75 Steakhouse Dinner: Filet Mignon, roasted broccoli, horseradish and dill mashed potatoes, and a double dirty martini. All made relatively quick on a Wednesday night. Boom!

The $75 Steakhouse Dinner: Filet Mignon, roasted broccoli, horseradish and dill mashed potatoes, and a double dirty martini. All made relatively quick on a Wednesday night. Boom!

For some reason, this recipe feels so 1950’s to me, because you put the steaks under the broiler. When I first cooked them, I was nervous they would be disappointing (like when you compare a pan-fried McDonald’s Burger to a char-broiled Whopper). However, this is not the case. It may be that you can’t go wrong when cooking quality steak with butter…But I am just going to go back to picturing myself as a 50’s housewife.

blurry action shot of the steak. There was a lot of excitement centered around this meal so taking photos while standing still was a bit difficult.

blurry action shot of the steak. There was a lot of excitement centered around this meal so taking photos while standing still was a bit difficult.

Wait, what’s this? Balsamic Syrup and Goat Cheese? I don’t think we’re in 1957 anymore. These additions catapult the steak into gourmet, almost girly territory. Basically, it is the perfect steak to make your average dude, because I can tell you right now no average dude is going to spend 18 minutes making balsamic syrup and adding melted goat cheese as the finishing touch.

Mmm. Steak.

Recipe
Filet Mignon with Balsamic Syrup & Goat Cheese
From Giada De Laurentiis
serves 2

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 (5 to 6-ounce) filet mignon steaks (each about 1-inch thick)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 ounces soft fresh goat cheese

Directions
Boil the balsamic vinegar and sugar in a heavy small saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir occasionally, until reduced by about half, about 18 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the broiler. Melt the butter in a heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle the steaks with salt and pepper. Cook the steaks to desired doneness, about 3 minutes per side for medium-rare. Transfer the steaks to a baking sheet. Crumble the cheese over the steaks and broil just until the cheese melts, about 1 minute. Sprinkle with pepper.

Transfer the steaks to plates. Drizzle the balsamic sauce around the steaks and serve.

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